Rattlesnake Vaccinations

Time to Get your Pet Vaccinated for Rattlesnake Bites!

Photo by:  John Sullivan of wildherps.com
Article from:  redrockbiologics.com

Rattlesnakes live in a variety of habitats.

They are found in wetlands, deserts and forests, from sea level to mountain elevations. Rattlesnakes are most active in warmer seasons, from spring to autumn. In southern latitudes they are occasionally found year-round.

Rattlesnake bite is a veterinary emergency.

It results in serious injury or even death to thousands of dogs each year. Rattlesnake venom is a complex mixture of toxins that spreads through a dog’s body following the bite. Red Rock Rattlesnake Vaccine was developed specifically to help defend dogs from the dangerous effects of rattlesnake venom. That’s rattlesnake protection that will put you and your dog at ease.

Dogs are at risk for rattlesnake bite.

They can encounter a rattlesnake anytime they are in rattlesnake habitat. You and your dog may live near rattlesnakes. You may travel through or frequently visit places where rattlesnakes are found. Perhaps rattlesnakes live where you take your dog hiking, camping or hunting. Like people, dogs may stumble upon a snake by accident. Curiosity or a protective instinct can place your dog at risk. Red Rock Rattlesnake Vaccine helps to protect her.

Damage caused by rattlesnake bite can be serious.

When injected into an unprotected dog, the toxins in snake venom are very painful and can have serious consequences. Even if your dog survives the immediate effects of a rattlesnake bite, he can be permanently injured by the venom.

Treatment of rattlesnake bite is expensive.

Treatment of snakebite may include antivenom injections that can cost hundreds to thousands of dollars. Use of antivenom is associated with an increased risk of adverse effects which can complicate a dog’s recovery. Other costs of snakebite treatment may include hospitalization, intravenous fluids, other medicines, and even surgery. Vaccination can reduce the impact of snakebite, reduce or eliminate the need for antivenom, and decrease other treatment costs.

The vaccine stimulates your dog’s own immunity.

Vaccines work by stimulating an animal’s immunity to defend against potentially harmful agents. The Rattlesnake Vaccine is intended to help create an immunity that will protect your dog against rattlesnake venom.

Snakebite is always an emergency.

Even after your dog is vaccinated against rattlesnake venom, she should be taken to a veterinarian for evaluation and care as soon as possible following snakebite. Veterinarians can determine whether your dog will require additional treatment. Even bites by non-venomous snakes can lead to serious infections and antibiotic treatment may be needed. A veterinarian is the best person to consult regarding medical decisions for your dog.

Your Dog’s Annual Exam

It’s that time of year again. Time to take your dog to the veterinarian for his annual examination. But maybe you’re thinking that you might skip it this year. After all, he isn’t sick. Maybe you will just put it off until next year – what could it hurt?

Actually, delaying an annual physical exam can hurt. Annual physical exams are an important part of providing optimal health care and the best longevity for your beloved companion. Dogs age quickly and they are unable to tell us if they are feeling a little off. Remember, it may be one year in your life but that can be about 5-10 comparative years in your pet’s life. A lot can change in that much time.

Sometimes, dogs can be ill for weeks and you are unaware of it. This may not be from a lack of monitoring or caring; your dog just hides his illness until it is so far advanced he has no choice but to show signs of disease.

Your veterinarian has special training and experience in detecting subtle illness in pets. Listening to the heart can detect murmurs. Increased lung sounds may indicate early illness. Abdominal palpation may reveal pain in certain areas, abnormal size and shape of various organs or even tumors. Checking out the eyes can detect early signs of cataract or other ocular problems. Ears may be in need of cleaning or medication. Dental disease may be detected as well as signs of allergies or skin problems. It’s easier for someone who doesn’t see your pet every day to detect lumps and bumps that you may not have noticed. Comparing annual weights, too, can determine if your dog is heading down the path to obesity or is slowly losing weight.

As a dog reaches middle to old age, annual physical exams become even more important. Certain problems that you may simply attribute to “old age,” and just something you will have to live with, may be signs of underling disease and may be very treatable. Annual physical exams also give you an opportunity to ask your veterinarian any questions you may have about your dog’s health. Your veterinarian may recommend certain additional tests to determine overall health based on physical exam findings or may have suggestions for improving the quality of your dog’s life. Remember, the primary goal for your veterinarian is to keep your dog healthy and provide the best care available. Your veterinarian cares a great deal about your dog – almost as much as you.

A physical examination is not just a chance for your vet to see how cute your dog is; a thorough exam can pick up on a variety of illnesses and prevent potential catastrophic disease. By finding, diagnosing and treating these problems early, your pet will live a much healthier and longer life.

For information on your Cat’s Annual Exam, please go here.